Kelly Hyman
Kelly Hyman - 2019 Alliance of Women Trial Lawyers Annual Conference

Kelly Hyman to Co-chair 2019 Alliance of Women Trial Lawyers Annual Conference

Attorney and legal analyst Kelly Hyman proud to announce attendance at this year’s Alliance For Women Trial Lawyers Annual Conference as co-chair and speaker.

Kelly HymanMarking Kelly Hyman‘s second consecutive year speaking at the highly prestigious event, Kelly Hyman is again set to attend this year’s upcoming Alliance For Women Trial Lawyers Annual Conference as a speaker and co-chair.

“I’m thrilled to share that I’ll be co-chairing and speaking at the 2019 Alliance of Women Trial Lawyers Annual Conference,” reveals Hyman.

Set to kick off on Saturday, September 7, and concluding on Monday, September 9, the 2019 Alliance of Women Trial Lawyers Annual Conference will be held at The Roosevelt New Orleans.

The Roosevelt New Orleans, in New Orleans, Louisiana, is a luxe, iconic Waldorf Astoria hotel, and exists in a grand 1860s building. With an upscale restaurant offering Italian cuisine, a sophisticated lounge serving seafood, an intimate cafe, and the historic Sazerac Bar, the venue also boasts a rooftop pool and cabanas, plus a fitness center and a full-service spa.

Kelly Hyman will be speaking on Monday, September 9 at 8:00 am. The accomplished attorney and legal analyst will open with ‘Effective Communication Techniques To Make Yourself Heard.’

The Alliance of Women Trial Lawyers’ mission statement centers around advancing the influence and impact of women in the legal community, according to Hyman. “The program hopes to unite, inspire, and empower women attorneys,” she explains, “through supporting the success of one another’s careers.”

The yearly conference, meanwhile, affords attendees a chance to take in a multitude of valuable presentations and promotes equally valuable networking opportunities among a wide variety of other benefits. “The event is the perfect place,” adds Hyman, “for women committed to excellence in the field and to building up their professional networks.”

Discounted tickets are offered to law students, clerks, and first-year associates. “The aim of this,” Hyman explains, “is to allow these attendees to further their reach, and to provide women just starting out in the industry with a perfect opportunity to attend, to network, and to learn from the best, and all at a significantly reduced cost.”

A staunch advocate for women in law, Kelly Hyman has a long history of speaking at law industry conferences and events across the United States. “It’s about helping others in the field,” she adds, wrapping up, “and I take every opportunity presented to me in order to help share my knowledge, and to promote the success of other women attorneys wherever possible.”

Kelly Hyman is a member of the American Association for Justice, the Florida Bar, the Washington D.C. Bar, the Colorado Bar, the Colorado Bar Association, as well as the Colorado chapter of the Federal Bar Association. Previously, Hyman enjoyed a successful career as an actress for 25 years in New York and California, appearing in various television shows, movies, Off-Broadway plays, commercials, and more. The actress-turned-attorney maintains a deep love for the entertainment industry today and still regularly appears on the nation’s screens as a highly respected TV legal analyst.

Kelly Hyman - Equal Pay in USA Women's Soccer

Kelly Hyman Examines Fight for Equal Pay in USA Women’s Soccer

Actress turned legal analyst and attorney Kelly Hyman explores the ongoing fight of the United States women’s national soccer team for equal pay.

Kelly Hyman AttorneyThis year has seen the United States women’s national soccer team scoop its fourth FIFA World Cup final win. Despite this, America’s professional women soccer players continue to face unequal pay, according to Kelly Hyman. An attorney with Franklin D. Azar & Associates in Denver, Colorado, the actress turned lawyer and legal analyst examines the ongoing fight for equal pay in women’s soccer.

“The USA women’s soccer team won its fourth FIFA World Cup championship in 2019,” explains Hyman, “yet they still face the challenge of fighting for equal pay.”

While some have argued that men’s sports are more popular and thus more lucrative, this year, the women’s USA soccer team drew a larger television audience than their male counterparts attracted during the previous year, according to Hyman. Key points, she says, surrounding the issue of equal pay for this year’s women champions center primarily on performance and revenue.

“The women’s FIFA World Cup finals have been held every four years since the first championship in 1991,” Hyman reveals. Incredibly, of the eight championships to date, the United States women’s national soccer team has triumphed in half of all the finals held, making it the most victorious team in the league. “America’s women soccer champions are setting records,” says Hyman, “something which isn’t going unnoticed.”

Indeed, as the United States, women’s national soccer team attracted a record-breaking crowd for the FIFA World Cup final this year, the near-60,000 capacity host stadium began to chant for fair pay. “‘Equal pay! Equal pay! Equal pay!’ erupted from the crowd,” adds Hyman.

Earlier this year, in March, 28 women, each of whom has played on the United States women’s national soccer team, filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against the U.S. Soccer Federation. “The suit accuses the organization of not providing the same standard of working conditions or pay,” Hyman explains, “when compared with the men’s soccer league.”

“The women, however,” she continues, “have completely outperformed the men, with the men’s team not even qualifying for the latest FIFA World Cup, for example.”

Kelly Hyman also explains how the women’s team is attracting a much larger television audience. “The women’s event attracted over 14 million American television viewers this year,” the attorney points out, “whereas the men’s championship last year drew only around 11 million, according to Nielsen figures.”

This is further reflected in in-game revenue. “From 2016 to 2018, the women’s games generated $50.8 million in revenue compared to the men’s games bringing in $49.9 million,” points out Hyman. The women players suing the U.S. Soccer Federation, therefore, have numerous highly valid points working in their favor as they dominate men both in terms of TV ratings and revenue, as well as championship performance. “Still,” she adds, “they continue to be paid far less.”

A recent report by The New York Times revealed that the prize money for the 2019 women’s FIFA World Cup was $30 million. This, says attorney Kelly Hyman, pales in comparison to the $400 million paid to the men the previous year. “Congress, however, is beginning to look into the matter,” adds the seasoned legal analyst.

A letter from 50 congress members to the president of the U.S. Soccer Federation has allegedly asked why women are paid so much less than men. “The letter stated that women players make around $30,000 less than male players,” explains Kelly Hyman, “while men also get almost 40 percent more in bonuses.”

“It’s hoped, therefore, that the matter will not only bring more attention to the issue of equal pay across the board,” she adds, wrapping up, “but also more attention to the sport of women’s soccer, helping further boost the salaries of women players.”

Kelly Hyman - Abstract Thinking in Law

Kelly Hyman Explores Abstract Thinking in Law

T.V. legal analyst and attorney Kelly Hyman offers adept insight into abstract thinking in law.

 

Kelly Hyman 3Many false perceptions, says Kelly Hyman, exist surrounding lawyers, from the profession, being ‘boring’ and ‘rigid,’ to the belief that legal professionals exist solely within specific personality types, often met with disdain. Here, the attorney and legal analyst set the record straight as she explores abstract thinking in law.

 

“Most people think that lawyers are boring professionals who read books all the time,” suggests Hyman. This, however, she says, is a wholly false perception. “The life of a lawyer is the opposite of the word ‘boring,'” says the T.V. legal analyst and attorney.

 

In fact, according to Hyman, an attorney leads an exciting life filled with creativity. It is not, she explains, a special field meant for specific personality types, nor should lawyers be met with disdain. “A lawyer needs to read, do research, write, and analyze extensively,” adds Hyman, “much of which calls for a great level of creativity.”

 

Hyman believes that many people rule out the possibility of having a legal career because they assume that attorneys are rigid individuals. “Quite the opposite,” says Kelly Hyman. “Instead, an attorney must define thoughts into real-life situations, and must transfer abstract concepts to actual situations,” she adds.

 

“Also,” Hyman continues, “a lawyer must think about different ways to argue a client’s case before a judge and jury, often interpreting legal regulations in a way which stretches the imagination.”

 

Consequently, according to Hyman, an attorney is rarely a boring individual, devoid of any creative thoughts. “The reality is, in fact,” she suggests, “that an excellent lawyer is the equivalent of a creative genius.”

 

For example, Hyman highlights how a class action lawsuit is not simply about filing a negligence case based on a legal argument. Rather, an attorney studies the details of a client’s case before deciding whether to file a claim. After filing such a lawsuit, a lawyer then develops arguments offering a client the opportunity to receive compensation for injuries, pain, or other sufferings.

 

“Ultimately,” adds Hyman, wrapping up, “I believe that an excellent attorney should help clients by interpreting laws in new, philosophical ways, extending far beyond written words.”

 

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Franklin D. Azar & Associates in Denver, Colorado, focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include current affairs, female empowerment, mindfulness, and the entertainment industry, Kelly Hyman, who previously enjoyed a successful career as an actress for more than two decades, is married to Judge Paul Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman - Abortion Ban Now Headed to Supreme Court

Kelly Hyman Remarks on Abortion Ban Now Headed to Supreme Court

Attorney Kelly Hyman considers the emotionally charged issue of Alabama’s new abortion law.

Kelly Hyman AttorneyRecently named among the top 25 class action trial lawyers in Colorado by The National Trial Lawyers, a professional organization of leading U.S. trial attorneys, native Floridian attorney and legal analyst Kelly Hyman comments on Alabama’s new abortion law, now likely headed to the Supreme Court.

“Alabama’s new abortion law has everyone taking a position on one side of the issue or the other,” Hyman suggests. While the public is emotionally charged by the issue, she says, supporters of the law are pursuing what she calls a deliberate tactic.

“The supporters of the law in Alabama’s legislative body are pursuing a deliberate tactic,” states Hyman, “and, ultimately, the law may force the U.S. Supreme Court to reevaluate the Roe vs. Wade doctrine.”

Roe vs. Wade was a 1973 landmark decision by the Supreme Court which ruled that a state law banning abortions, other than to save the life of the mother, was unconstitutional.

Alabama’s abortion law is set to go into practice in November and would represent the harshest abortion law currently in place in the United States, according to Kelly Hyman.

Political action groups, however, are currently taking legal action to block the enactment of the law. “They’re not alone, either,” Hyman, a graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, suggests.

Indeed, numerous so-called reproductive rights groups have also promised to launch lawsuits, against the state of Alabama, after learning that state governor Kay Ivey signed the bill.

Under the new law, it would be illegal for any healthcare provider to participate, or to attempt to participate, in abortion procedures, for almost any reason. “While the law makes allowances for instances in which the pregnant patient’s life is at risk, there are related restrictions which must also be considered,” adds Hyman.

Found guilty of violating the law, medical practitioners stand to face hefty fines and decades in prison. “While public criticism of the law has spread across the country, Alabama lawmakers may not expect the law to hold up to legal scrutiny,” Hyman reveals.

In fact, according to the attorney, they may expect the law to be defeated in the state’s lower courts as it violates the protections offered by Roe vs. Wade, making abortion legal in many circumstances since the 1970s. “Still,” she continues, “they may pursue the issue all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, wishing to have the Roe vs. Wade decision challenged.”

Lawsuits filed by action groups such as Planned Parenthood argue that the new law violates other rights, too, specifically the 14th Amendment, which guarantees the right to liberty. The 14th Amendment is also said to imply a right to privacy; a right which is further violated, lawsuit documents suggest, by the abortion law, according to Hyman.

“Other states also facing lawsuits to challenge restrictive abortion laws include Ohio, Mississippi, and Kentucky,” she adds, wrapping up.

Kelly Hyman - Top Class Action Lawsuit Attorney

Kelly Hyman Named Top Class Action Lawsuit Attorney

Kelly Hyman Attorney

Attorney Kelly Hyman named among top 25 class action trial lawyers.

Following news of her recently received, highly prestigious AV Preeminent rating from Martindale-Hubbell for the third year running, attorney Kelly Hyman has subsequently also been named as one of the top 25 class action trial lawyers in Colorado by The National Trial Lawyers, a professional organization of leading U.S. trial attorneys. A native Floridian now settled in Denver, Hyman offers a closer look at both accolades.

“The organization, The National Trial Lawyers, is comprised of premier trial lawyers from across the United States,” explains Hyman, “who exemplify superior qualifications as either criminal defense or civil plaintiff lawyers.”

An AV Preeminent rating, meanwhile, is a designation trusted worldwide by buyers of legal services, according to the award-winning attorney.

“I’m immensely pleased with both the recognition from The National Trial Lawyers, and my renewed, highest-possible AV Preeminent rating from Martindale-Hubbell, which I’ve now held for three consecutive years,” adds Hyman, an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation.

An avid industry speaker, Kelly Hyman regularly provides legal analysis for shows such as Fox News, and Fox and Friends, and has appeared on Kansas’ Jiggy Jaguar radio show. “The show boasts more than 12,000 daily listeners and centers on issues which the mainstream media is not currently covering,” she explains.

Hyman has also appeared on Issues and Ideas with Chris DeBellow, known for its expertly presented current events coverage, and The Whistleblower with Mychal Wilson, a weekly, nonpartisan political radio show widely available to stream online.

In her work, attorney Kelly Hyman is heavily concentrated on mass tort litigation, a civil action involving numerous plaintiffs against one or more defendants in either state or federal court.

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Franklin D. Azar & Associates in Denver, Colorado, focused on class action lawsuits. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s issues whose other interests include current events, voting rights, female empowerment, and the entertainment industry, Kelly Hyman—who previously enjoyed a successful career as an actress for more than two decades between California and New York—is married to Judge Paul Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman

Kelly Hyman Opens Up about Advocacy Work and Beliefs

Attorney Kelly Hyman speaks openly about her career, advocacy work, and personal beliefs.

A native Floridian now settled in Denver, Colorado, Kelly Hyman is an Australian-American actor turned attorney and television legal analyst. A keen champion for social justice, women’s rights, the power of mindfulness, and the Democratic Party, here, Hyman reveals more about her advocacy work and other beliefs.

“I’m a firm believer in equality, social justice, and women’s rights,” reveals the attorney, who regularly appears as a legal analyst on television shows such as Fox and Friends.

Touching more closely on social justice, Hyman turns to a United Nations document titled Social Justice in an Open World: The Role of the United Nations. “The document states, ‘Social justice may be broadly understood as the fair and compassionate distribution of the fruits of economic growth,'” she reveals.

“This meets,” suggests Kelly Hyman, “with the most widely accepted, modern take on social justice, whereby which significant focus is placed upon, for example, human rights education, health care, and ecology and the environment.”

In her professional life, attorney Kelly Hyman handles mass tort litigation, a civil action involving numerous plaintiffs against one or more defendants in either state or federal court. “The four main categories of mass tort litigation in the United States,” she adds, “cover prescription drug injuries, medical device injuries, product liability injuries, and what’s known as toxic contamination.”

On a more personal level, the attorney is a staunch advocate for women’s rights and a keen follower of current events.

Furthermore, Hyman has previously spoken out about the importance of mindfulness, has uncovered key concerns among today’s women in business, and has examined the history of women’s suffrage in the United States. “Becoming part of the U.S. Constitution on August 26, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment, to this day, states, ‘The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex,'” she explains.

The attorney and television legal analyst is also a committed supporter of the Democratic Party. “The party seeks,” adds Hyman, wrapping up, “to promote policies centered around topics such as environmental and consumer protection, support for labor unions, equal opportunities, LGBT rights, same-sex marriage, universal health care, stricter gun laws, and campaign finance, police, and immigration reform.”

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, voting rights, and female empowerment, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman - Brief History of the Democratic Party

Kelly Hyman Offers a Brief History of the Democratic Party

Democratic Party supporter and legal professional Kelly Hyman shares a brief history of the U.S. political organization.

 

Kelly Hyman 3One of the two major contemporary U.S. political parties, the Democratic Party was founded around 1828, today making it the world’s oldest active political party. A staunch advocate for social justice, voting rights, and the Democratic Party, attorney Kelly Hyman takes a brief look back at the history of the organization.

 

“Founded in the late 1820s by supporters of Andrew Jackson, an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States until 1837, the Democratic Party has changed considerably in the years since,” explains Hyman, a Colorado-based attorney who regularly provides legal analysis for shows such as Fox News, and Fox and Friends.

 

From a dominant initial worldview centered chiefly around social conservatism and economic liberalism before later switching to promote a more social liberal platform and supporting social justice, well into the 20th century, the Democratic Party still boasted many highly conservative views and agendas, according to Hyman.

 

It was not, in fact, she says, until the 1960s and 1970s that the modern Democratic Party known today began to fully emerge. “Today, Democratic Party supporters are heavily comprised of those living in metropolitan areas and the suburbs, women, millennials, college graduates, and ethnic, sexual, and gender minorities,” Hyman explains.

 

The modern Democratic Party’s philosophy of liberalism also advocates economic and social equality, along with the so-called welfare state. “The party seeks,” says Hyman, “to provide not just government intervention and regulation in the economy, but also to promote policies centered around the likes of environmental protection, support for labor unions, social programs, affordable college tuition, and universal health care.”

 

An advocate for voting rights and female empowerment, Hyman goes on to point out that the Democratic Party further works to promote equal opportunities and consumer protection. “Also forming a large part of the core of the party’s policies are stricter gun laws, campaign finance reform, police and immigration reform, LGBT rights, same-sex marriage, and the legalization of marijuana,” reveals the attorney.

 

Since the party’s inception almost two centuries ago, fifteen Democrats have served as president of the United States. “The first,” says Hyman, “was President Andrew Jackson, while the most recent was President Barack Obama, who held office from 2009 to 2017.”

 

Subsequently, and following the 2018 midterm elections, the Democrats went on to hold a majority in the House of Representatives and the mayoralty of numerous major American cities. “As of May 2019,” adds Hyman, wrapping up, “four of the nine sitting justices of the Supreme Court have been appointed by Democratic presidents.”

 

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, voting rights, and female empowerment, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman - Passions and Interests

Attorney Kelly Hyman Shares Details of Her Passions and Interests

Kelly Hyman reveals her continued support for equal and human rights, social justice, voting rights, and more.

 

Kelly Hyman 2From women’s issues and concerns of the working woman to current events, social justice, and the law, attorney Kelly Hyman’s personal and professional interests and passions are both broad and far-reaching.

 

“Further to staying up-to-date with news and current affairs, the law, and women’s issues, I’m also a staunch advocate for social justice, voting rights, and the Democratic Party,” reveals Hyman, a native Floridian of Australian-American heritage who enjoyed a successful acting career before turning her attention to the legal profession.

 

Another of Hyman’s interests centers around mindfulness, and the importance of the process. Mindfulness involves achieving a mental state wherein an individual’s awareness is focused around the present moment, allowing them to more clearly accept their thoughts, feelings, and other sensations. “It’s important that we all understand the benefits of mindfulness,” suggests Hyman, a graduate of the University of Florida College of Law.

 

Hyman has recently championed and expressed her ongoing support for social justice and the rise of so-called social justice movements. “A concept of just and fair relations between people and society, social justice is measured by the tacit and explicit terms for the distribution of wealth, as well as social privileges and opportunities,” explains the lawyer.

 

A United Nations document titled Social Justice in an Open World: The Role of the United Nations states, ‘Social justice may be broadly understood as the fair and compassionate distribution of the fruits of economic growth.’

 

“This,” adds Hyman, “is in line with the most widely accepted, modern take on social justice, where a heavy focus is placed on health care, ecology and environment, and human rights education.”

 

Hyman also touches briefly on women’s issues in 2019, believing that, from grassroots activism to global action, an exciting period of history is here. “From sexism and gender-based violence to reproductive health, the term ‘women’s issues’ has long been used as something of an umbrella term,” she explains, “often presented without a precise definition.”

 

“Accordingly, and therefore, it’s important,” Hyman continues, “that in 2019 we work to address not just so-called ‘women’s issues,’ but important issues more generally and across the board, including equality, transparency in politics, world peace, and human rights.”

 

Further to her professional legal work and personal support for equal and human rights, social justice, and other good causes and initiatives, Hyman has previously appeared in numerous television shows, movies, and commercials.

 

The actor-turned-attorney is perhaps best known for playing the roles of Loretta on The Young and the Restless, and Donna in the movie Doin’ Time on Planet Earth starring Adam West. Hyman also starred in Gettin’ There, has performed Off-Broadway in New York City, and can be heard in her capacity as a voice actor in numerous commercials including the now-famous ‘give me a break’ Kit Kat ad.

 

Today combining her previous television, cinematic, and theatrical experience with her in-depth knowledge of the law, attorney Kelly Hyman regularly provides legal analysis for shows such as Law & Crime, The Ingraham Angle, Fox News, and Fox and Friends. She has also appeared on Issues and Ideas with Chris DeBellow, The Ethan Bearman Show, and The Whistleblower with Mychal Wilson.

 

Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. She is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

KELLY HYMAN EXAMINES WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE IN THE UNITED STATES

Kelly Hyman examines women\'s suffrage in the United States
Attorney and advocate for social justice Kelly Hyman looks back on the legal right of women in the United States of America to vote.

The legal right of women in the United States of America to vote, U.S. women’s suffrage was established nationally in 1920. An attorney and a keen advocate for social justice and women’s rights based in Denver, Colorado, Kelly Hyman takes a closer look at the subject as she reveals more about women’s suffrage in the United States.

“Established over the course of more than 50 years, women’s suffrage wasn’t recognized nationally in the United States until less than a century ago,” reveals Hyman.

More than half a century in the making, first in individual states and localities, and often on a limited basis, women’s suffrage in the U.S. was finally established nationally in 1920. Yet, in fact, according to Hyman, the same demand for women’s suffrage dates back as far as the 1840s. “Emerging from the broader women’s rights movement which was gathering pace at the time, the subject of suffrage became a key area of focus among many of those involved in the movement by the time that the inaugural National Women’s Rights Convention came around in 1850,” explains the attorney.

It was not, however, until the late 1860s that the first national suffrage organizations were established. Two competing groups, one led jointly by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and one by Lucy Stone, would later join forces, in 1890, to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association.

“Another organization, around during the same period and known as the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, also pursued the same cause, giving a further boost to the women’s suffrage movement,” adds Kelly Hyman. “Throughout the 1870s and 1880s,” she continues, “suffragists made numerous attempts to vote, filing lawsuits when they were turned away.”

Indeed, in 1872, suffragist Susan B. Anthony, who would later become the head of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, succeeded in voting but was quickly arrested for the act. Found guilty in a widely publicized trial, the women’s suffrage movement gained fresh momentum as a result. “What ultimately followed was a decades-long campaign for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution,” Hyman reveals, “which would enfranchise women, and which began in earnest working for suffrage on a largely state-by-state basis.”

Years later and more than a decade-and-a-half into the 20th century, American suffragist, feminist, and women’s rights activist Alice Paul formed the National Woman’s Party. “Established in 1916, the National Woman’s Party was focused on the passage of a national suffrage amendment,” explains Hyman.

Picketing the White House the following year, in 1917, more than 200 National Woman’s Party supporters were arrested, many of whom were sent to prison. Now boasting two million members, however, the National American Woman Suffrage Association promptly made a national suffrage amendment its number one priority. Following a hard-fought series of votes within U.S. Congress, as well as in state legislatures, the so-called Nineteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution three years later.

“Becoming part of the U.S. Constitution on August 26, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment, to this day, states, ‘The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex,’” adds Hyman, wrapping up.

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, voting rights, and female empowerment, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman reveals importance of mindfulness

Kelly Hyman 

Attorney Kelly Hyman shares personal insight into the importance of mindfulness.

Defined as the state of being conscious or aware of circumstances and surroundings, mindfulness involves achieving a mental state wherein which an individual’s awareness is centered around the present moment, allowing them to more clearly accept their feelings, thoughts, and other sensations. Today widely used as a therapeutic technique, University of Florida College of Law graduate, Television Legal Analysis, attorney Kelly Hyman offers a closer, personal look at the process.

“An innate human ability to be wholly present and aware of what’s going on around us, it’s important that we all understand the benefits of mindfulness,” suggests Hyman, who specializes on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. Regularly practicing and employing mindfulness is important, she says, as not to become overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on in life. “The goal of mindfulness is to awaken the innermost workings of our emotional, mental, and physical processes,” adds the successful attorney.

According to Mindful.org, growing research now demonstrates that when an individual trains themselves to be as mindful as possible, they’re physically remodeling the structure of their brain and the core of their entire nervous system.

A mission-driven nonprofit, Mindful.org is dedicated to inspiring, guiding, and connecting those who wish to explore mindfulness, such as attorney Kelly Hyman. Their goal, according to the organization, is to allow people of all ages to enjoy better mental and physical health, and more caring relationships, in order to promote a more compassionate society overall.

“Personally, practicing mindfulness allows me to better understand and approach day-to-day life, obstacles, and other challenges, as well as to connect better with others, lower my stress levels, and perfectly focus my mind, both personally and professionally,” reveals Hyman.

Others who regularly practice mindfulness also praise the process for allowing them to form a better relationship with both mental and physical pain. Most of those who routinely embrace mindfulness do so by employing meditation, breathing exercises, and other practices.

“Yoga and mindfulness combine well together, for example,” adds Hyman, wrapping up, “so, for those looking to learn more about the process, yoga classes are often an excellent place to start.”

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, voting rights, and female empowerment, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.