KellyHyman

KELLY HYMAN EXAMINES WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE IN THE UNITED STATES

Kelly Hyman examines women\'s suffrage in the United States
Attorney and advocate for social justice Kelly Hyman looks back on the legal right of women in the United States of America to vote.

The legal right of women in the United States of America to vote, U.S. women’s suffrage was established nationally in 1920. An attorney and a keen advocate for social justice and women’s rights based in Denver, Colorado, Kelly Hyman takes a closer look at the subject as she reveals more about women’s suffrage in the United States.

“Established over the course of more than 50 years, women’s suffrage wasn’t recognized nationally in the United States until less than a century ago,” reveals Hyman.

More than half a century in the making, first in individual states and localities, and often on a limited basis, women’s suffrage in the U.S. was finally established nationally in 1920. Yet, in fact, according to Hyman, the same demand for women’s suffrage dates back as far as the 1840s. “Emerging from the broader women’s rights movement which was gathering pace at the time, the subject of suffrage became a key area of focus among many of those involved in the movement by the time that the inaugural National Women’s Rights Convention came around in 1850,” explains the attorney.

It was not, however, until the late 1860s that the first national suffrage organizations were established. Two competing groups, one led jointly by Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and one by Lucy Stone, would later join forces, in 1890, to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association.

“Another organization, around during the same period and known as the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, also pursued the same cause, giving a further boost to the women’s suffrage movement,” adds Kelly Hyman. “Throughout the 1870s and 1880s,” she continues, “suffragists made numerous attempts to vote, filing lawsuits when they were turned away.”

Indeed, in 1872, suffragist Susan B. Anthony, who would later become the head of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, succeeded in voting but was quickly arrested for the act. Found guilty in a widely publicized trial, the women’s suffrage movement gained fresh momentum as a result. “What ultimately followed was a decades-long campaign for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution,” Hyman reveals, “which would enfranchise women, and which began in earnest working for suffrage on a largely state-by-state basis.”

Years later and more than a decade-and-a-half into the 20th century, American suffragist, feminist, and women’s rights activist Alice Paul formed the National Woman’s Party. “Established in 1916, the National Woman’s Party was focused on the passage of a national suffrage amendment,” explains Hyman.

Picketing the White House the following year, in 1917, more than 200 National Woman’s Party supporters were arrested, many of whom were sent to prison. Now boasting two million members, however, the National American Woman Suffrage Association promptly made a national suffrage amendment its number one priority. Following a hard-fought series of votes within U.S. Congress, as well as in state legislatures, the so-called Nineteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution three years later.

“Becoming part of the U.S. Constitution on August 26, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment, to this day, states, ‘The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex,’” adds Hyman, wrapping up.

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, voting rights, and female empowerment, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman reveals importance of mindfulness

Kelly Hyman 

Attorney Kelly Hyman shares personal insight into the importance of mindfulness.

Defined as the state of being conscious or aware of circumstances and surroundings, mindfulness involves achieving a mental state wherein which an individual’s awareness is centered around the present moment, allowing them to more clearly accept their feelings, thoughts, and other sensations. Today widely used as a therapeutic technique, University of Florida College of Law graduate, Television Legal Analysis, attorney Kelly Hyman offers a closer, personal look at the process.

“An innate human ability to be wholly present and aware of what’s going on around us, it’s important that we all understand the benefits of mindfulness,” suggests Hyman, who specializes on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. Regularly practicing and employing mindfulness is important, she says, as not to become overly reactive or overwhelmed by what’s going on in life. “The goal of mindfulness is to awaken the innermost workings of our emotional, mental, and physical processes,” adds the successful attorney.

According to Mindful.org, growing research now demonstrates that when an individual trains themselves to be as mindful as possible, they’re physically remodeling the structure of their brain and the core of their entire nervous system.

A mission-driven nonprofit, Mindful.org is dedicated to inspiring, guiding, and connecting those who wish to explore mindfulness, such as attorney Kelly Hyman. Their goal, according to the organization, is to allow people of all ages to enjoy better mental and physical health, and more caring relationships, in order to promote a more compassionate society overall.

“Personally, practicing mindfulness allows me to better understand and approach day-to-day life, obstacles, and other challenges, as well as to connect better with others, lower my stress levels, and perfectly focus my mind, both personally and professionally,” reveals Hyman.

Others who regularly practice mindfulness also praise the process for allowing them to form a better relationship with both mental and physical pain. Most of those who routinely embrace mindfulness do so by employing meditation, breathing exercises, and other practices.

“Yoga and mindfulness combine well together, for example,” adds Hyman, wrapping up, “so, for those looking to learn more about the process, yoga classes are often an excellent place to start.”

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class action lawsuits and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, voting rights, and female empowerment, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman

KELLY HYMAN EXPLAINS MASS TORT LITIGATION

UCLA and University of Florida College of Law graduate and attorney Kelly Hyman offers a professional insight into mass tort litigation.

A civil action involving numerous plaintiffs against one or more defendants in either state or federal court, mass tort litigation lawsuits usually arise when a defendant or defendants cause harm to multiple plaintiffs via prescribed medication, medical devices, other defective products, or from pollution and other contaminants, for example.  An attorney that practices in the areas of class actions and mass tort litigation, Colorado-based attorney Kelly Hyman explains more about the process.

“Mass tort litigation allows an attorney or a group of attorney to represent several parties in otherwise individual cases,” explains Hyman, an attorney in the field of mass tort litigation. “Sometimes the process may even extend to a nationwide network of lawyers across the United States, all of whom can pool resources, ideas, and information in order to ensure justice for all involved,” she adds.

The four main categories of mass tort litigation, according to Hyman, cover medical device injuries, prescription drug injuries, product liability injuries, and toxic contamination. “In federal courts in the United States, mass tort lawsuits are often consolidated as multidistrict litigation,” she explains.

Pharmaceutical mass torts, also known as dangerous drug mass torts, are currently the most common type of mass tort in the United States, with more than 1,000 cases filed each year across the nation, according to reports. In recent years, pharmaceutical mass torts have been brought against companies including Reglan, Risperdal, Invokana, Eliquis, and Pradaxa.

“It should be noted,” Hyman explains, “that mass tort litigation routinely involves massive cost, and often relies closely on a level of efficiency and an economy of scale largely unique to the process in law.”

“Requiring a huge effort from legal assistants, paralegals, and junior associates, for example, to handle and manage such a case—and the volume of paperwork which often comes with mass tort litigation—anyone looking seriously into the process would be advised to seek the advice of a specialist legal professional in the first instance,” she adds, wrapping up.

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class actions and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, voting rights, female empowerment, and mindfulness, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman

Attorney Kelly Hyman discusses support for social justice

Kelly Hyman addresses social justice as she shares more about the concept and the rise of so-called social justice movements.

Defined as justice in terms of the distribution of wealth, privileges, and opportunities within a society, social justice is a concept close to attorney Kelly Hyman’s heart. Here, the legal professional and advocate for women’s rights reveals more about her support for social justice both in the U.S. and globally.

“A concept of fair and just relations between individuals and society, social justice is measured by the explicit and tacit terms for the distribution of wealth,” Denver-based Hyman explains, “as well as social privileges and opportunities.”

While definitions vary between contemporary theories and religious perspectives, a United Nations document titled ‘Social Justice in an Open World: The Role of the United Nations’ states, “Social justice may be broadly understood as the fair and compassionate distribution of the fruits of economic growth.”

This, says Hyman, is in line with the most widely accepted, modern take on social justice. “From a more religious perspective, however,” she adds, “Hinduism, Islam, Christianity—both Methodism and Catholicism—and Judaism, plus other religions and belief systems, each possess their own approach to social teachings and justice.”

Such teachings are widely reflected in the work of a number of social justice movements, according to the attorney, dedicated to the realization of a world where all members of a society share equal rights and access to benefits, regardless of background or procedural justice.

“The global justice movement, for example,” Kelly Hyman continues, “is a network of globalized social movements opposed to so-called corporate globalization, committed to promoting equal distribution of economic resources.”

Such movements, she suggests, are generally heavily focused on health care, ecology and environment, and human rights education.

“Often borrowing from the counterculture of the 1960s,” Hyman adds, wrapping up, “social justice movements may also focus on progressivism, climate justice, resource justice, and the right to housing and social security, as well as social work and social law, among countless other issues and concerns.”

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Denver, Colorado-based Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class actions and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for social justice and women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, voting rights, female empowerment, and mindfulness, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman

Kelly Hyman discusses key concerns among today’s women in business

Attorney Kelly Hyman explores a handful of the primary concerns faced by today’s modern working women.

According to a poll by the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the modern working woman faces a number of significant issues and concerns, from maintaining a healthy work-life balance to the gender pay gap. An attorney from Denver, Colorado, Kelly Hyman takes a closer look at the poll’s findings.

“The list of concerns, some of which are critical, highlighted by the Thomson Reuters Foundation poll affect women in all aspects of business,” suggests Hyman, “in many, if not all, of the leading economies in today’s developed world.”

According to the foundation, its data captures how modern working women feel, how they believe that they fare in the workplace, and how they tackle the myriad of other challenges that they—as well as colleagues of any gender—face day-to-day.

The organization states that while countless statistics surrounding professional, modern, working women—and women in business more generally—already exist, few capture these challenges or issues adequately or succinctly enough. “Existing data and statistics, arguably, don’t show us the entire picture,” adds Kelly Hyman.

It’s with this firmly in mind that the Thomson Reuters Foundation, backed and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, sought to poll more than 9,500 women at work for the issues which they, personally, feel affect them most profoundly.

A registered charity in the United States and the United Kingdom, the Thomson Reuters Foundation is the London-based charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, a Canadian global information and news network. The Rockefeller Foundation, meanwhile, is a private foundation based in New York City, established by the six-generation Rockefeller family, and whose mission is to improve the well-being of humanity around the world.

“All of the data collected,” Hyman points out, “came from so-called ‘advanced economies,’ all of which are in the G20.”

According to the research, in fifth place among highlighted concerns was children and career, while in fourth place was career opportunities. Third was harassment, while second centered around equal pay, with four in every 10 women polled seeing the gender pay gap as a key issue.

“In first place, however,” says Hyman, “and perhaps unsurprisingly, was maintaining a healthy work-life balance.”

The majority of those polled suggested that maintaining a healthy work-life balance was a key concern in their professional endeavors.

“All of the issues highlighted are important and must be addressed,” adds Denver attorney Kelly Hyman, wrapping up, “however, based on the figures, it may be suggested that we begin by gaining a better understanding of the difficulties faced by modern working women in maintaining a healthy work-life balance, and then approach the rest of the issues from there.”

A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is an attorney at Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class actions and mass tort litigation. A staunch advocate for women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, social justice, voting rights, female empowerment, and mindfulness, she is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.

Kelly Hyman

Attorney Kelly Hyman explores women’s issues in 2019

T.V. Legal analysis and attorney Kelly Hyman takes a closer look at women’s issues in today’s society.

A respected attorney and keen advocate for a variety of issues and initiatives, Kelly Hyman—perhaps best known for playing the role of Loretta on The Young and the Restless—unwraps the matter of women’s issues in today’s society as she reveals more about her passion for equality, balance, peace, human rights, and more.

“From gender-based violence and sexism to reproductive health, the term ‘women’s issues’ has long been used as something of an umbrella term,” explains Hyman, “often presented without a precise definition.”

Also commonly presented with somewhat divisive undertones, she says, while generally well-intentioned, the subject of women’s issues presents as something of a paradox. “The term ‘women’s issues’ in itself can create barriers,” explains Hyman, “to men’s involvement, when, in fact, both men and women must together participate in seeking a resolution to any such issue or issues.”

“From equality,” she continues, “to barriers and other obstacles, politics, world peace, and human rights, it’s important that we work together to define what’s really meant when we talk about not just ‘women’s issues,’ but important issues more generally and across the board.”
Hyman is also keen to reflect on balance. While by no means strictly a women’s issue in itself, according to the respected attorney, balance is, instead, she says, more of a business issue, with the race now on for gender-balanced boardrooms, governments, media coverage, and more. “In fact, the theme for this year’s International Women’s Day, on March 8, was #BalanceforBetter,” she explains.

“The future is exciting,” Kelly Hyman adds, “so, together, let’s help to build a truly balanced world.”
From grassroots activism to global action, Hyman believes that an exciting period of history is here, where the world deserves balance, and where its absence is noticed, and its presence is celebrated. “Balance,” adds the Denver-based attorney, wrapping up, “gender-focused or otherwise, is essential for economies and communities to thrive, and, collectively, we can all play a part in building a more balanced future for one and all.”

International Women’s Day is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity, according to the initiative’s organizers.

A native Floridian now settled in Denver, Colorado, Kelly Hyman is an Australian-American who was raised between New York City and Southern California. Appearing on numerous television shows including The Young and the Restless, Law & Crime, Fox News, the Ethan Bearman show, and The Ingraham Angle, Hyman is a staunch advocate for women’s rights whose other interests include the law, current events, social justice, voting rights, female empowerment, and mindfulness. A graduate of UCLA and the University of Florida College of Law, Kelly Hyman is today an attorney at Franklin D. Azar & Associates focused on class actions and mass tort litigation. She is happily married to federal judge Paul G. Hyman, Jr.